SWINE FLU SHOCK – IS IT A BIOLOGICAL WEAPON?

SWINE FLU SHOCK – IS IT A BIOLOGICAL WEAPON?

SWINE FLU SHOCK – IS IT A BIOLOGICAL WEAPON?

Pattaya-29 July 2009 (PDN): As type A (H1N1) flu continues its relentless toll in Thailand, seemingly largely defeating preventative measures, there are disturbing reports that the flu is not one type but, in fact, already a cocktail of human, avian and swine viruses. Which means most antidotes will be ineffective, especially if it turns out to be an ‘escaped biological weapon’; one of the latest claims!

Ever since the type A (H1N1) flu virus came to Thailand, there have been confused and often misleading statements in the media and from the government regarding the true statistics about the number of people infected in Thailand. Initially, great store was put in the thermal sensors installed at the airports being able to effectively prevent the virus entering via this portal, that is until the Minister of Health expressed his concern about travelers dodging the checks! The sensors have obviously been ineffective.

Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_swine_flu_outbreak) is normally an informative source, as they are supposedly furnished with the latest updates by the Health Ministry, but although the statistics on deaths is more accurate than MCOT, one of the government media outlets, the number of infections on both sources is woefully out of date, if reports by Pongphon Sarnsamak in ‘The Nation’, published on July 23, are anything to go by …. “ Dr Kamnuan Ungchusak, spokesperson for the Disease Control Department, said the ministry estimated the "real" number of people who had caught the typeA (H1N1) flu strain in the three months since the outbreak hit the country in early May was about 440,000. This was based on a ratio of about 10 deaths per 100,000 people infected with the new virus. “

full article
sitfu.com
Taking a Closer Look at the Stories Ignored by the Mainstream Media
Posted on 11:49 PM by x and filed under , , | 0 Comments »

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Archive